Offshore Wind


Electricity generated by wind turbines located in the sea is a relatively new form of electricity generation pioneered in Europe since the early 1990s. The wind resource at sea is generally of a more constant nature with greater wind speeds than on land and with fewer obstacles resulting in a higher capacity factor utilisation from the generation assets.

Why use
offshore wind?


Electricity generated by wind turbines located in the sea is a relatively new, yet proven, form of electricity generation pioneered in Europe since the early 1990s. The wind resource at sea is generally of a more constant nature with greater wind speeds than on land and with fewer obstacles resulting in a higher capacity factor utilisation from the generation assets.


There has been a greater recognition of the opportunities for offshore wind energy generation in the northern hemisphere, particularly Europe, where there are greater issues with competing land uses, be it for agricultural, industrial or residential purposes, that would otherwise be used to generate electricity. Offshore wind energy generation does not compete with those uses and also has lesser restrictions related to the size of the facilities and presents great opportunities for achieving larger economies of scale.

To help meet energy security issues, offshore wind energy, with its ability to produce greater electricity more constantly than other forms of renewable energy, provides an opportunity to meet this goal, along with other goals such as meeting international climate change commitments made by Australia and many other nations.



With identification of suitable sites, construction and utliisation of the right infrastructure, the opportunities for offshore wind energy to develop are very promising. Offshore Energy is committed to identifying and developing suitable sites initially in Australia, working with suitable partners with the right experience.

The benefits of
offshore wind


Offshore wind energy has been developed mainly in Europe and the UK since the early-mid 1990s. Its’ development has been driven by the need to diversify the energy mix, minimise multiple land use issues and, more recently, by a decreasing cost of producing energy as it has started to become more cost competitive with traditional forms of energy generation and other competing renewable energy generation.

More recently, developed economies such as the USA have committed to the development of offshore wind. This development highlights the opportunity for creating economic opportunities and skillsets to be embraced by Australia to progress the Project.

The key benefits of offshore wind energy include:

  • A decreasing levelised cost of energy that places offshore wind as a cost competitive producer of electricity, particularly given the economies of scale of offshore wind farms which tend to be larger given the lesser restrictions on available land/sea size.
  • High yielding and more consistent wind regime that ensures that the energy resource is maximised.
  • Reduction of social issues associated with other generation facilities related to visual amenity impacts and carbon pollution.
  • The creation of employment opportunities for local communities as offshore wind farms are greatly reliant on local content for construction, operation and maintenance of offshore wind projects.
  • Contribution to national and international carbon pollution and climate change commitments.

Linking with Offshore Energy

The development of offshore energy generation in Australia will provide many opportunities to progress this important industry. Offshore Energy is pleased to hear from those interested in contributing to Australia’s offshore energy future.

Further Information